BUNCH

In den 60er Jahren gab es acht Computerunternehmen, die Schneewittchen und die sieben Zwerge genannt wurden. IBM war das Schneewittchen, die Zwerge waren Burroughs, UNIVAC, NCR (National Cash Register), Control Data, Honeywell, RCA (Radio Corporation of America) und General Electric.

1970 verkaufte General Electric seine Computersparte an Honeywell. 1971 wurde der Computerbereich von RCA eingestellt. Die Initialen der verblieben Zwerge lauteten "BUNCH". Es steht für Burroughs, UNIVAC, NCR, Control Data und Honeywell.

In den 1980er und 1990er Jahren löste sich BUNCH auf: Univac wurde von Burroughs übernommen, es entstand Unisys; Control Data stellte den Computerbau ein und Honeywell verkaufte die Computersparte an Bull Computer.


Wikimedia Foundation.

Schlagen Sie auch in anderen Wörterbüchern nach:

  • Bunch — may refer to: * BUNCH, competitors in computer manufacturing * The Bunch, a 1972 folk rock group * Bunch grass, any grass of the Poaceae family * Bunch, Oklahoma, a village in the state of Oklahoma in the United States of America * Chris Bunch,… …   Wikipedia

  • Bunch — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Chris Bunch (1943–2005), US amerikanischer Autor David R. Bunch (1925–2000), US amerikanischer Science Fiction Autor John Bunch (1921–2010), US amerikanischer Jazz Pianist Robert Bunch (1820–1881),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • BUNCH — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda BUNCH, acrónimo de Burroughs, UNIVAC, NCR, Control Data y Honeywell, era el término con el que se conocía en los años 1960 al grupo de empresas capaces de competir con el claro e indiscutible monopolio de IBM en el… …   Wikipedia Español

  • bunch — /bunch/, n. 1. a connected group; cluster: a bunch of grapes. 2. a group of things: a bunch of papers. 3. Informal. a group of people: They re a fine bunch of students. 4. a knob; lump; protuberance. v.t. 5. to group together; make a bunch of.… …   Universalium

  • bunch — as a collective noun in abstract senses (a bunch of people / a bunch of questions) varies widely in its degree of informality from simple metaphor (A bunch of weary runners crossed the line at last) to near slang, often affected by the word it… …   Modern English usage

  • bunch — [bunch] n. [ME bonche, bundle, hump < OFr (Walloon) bouge < Fl boudje, dim. of boud, bundle] 1. a cluster or tuft of things growing together [a bunch of grapes] 2. a collection of things of the same kind fastened or grouped together, or… …   English World dictionary

  • Bunch — (b[u^]nch; 224), n. [Akin to OSw. & Dan. bunke heap, Icel. bunki heap, pile, bunga tumor, protuberance; cf. W. pwng cluster. Cf. {Bunk}.] 1. A protuberance; a hunch; a knob or lump; a hump. [1913 Webster] They will carry . . . their treasures… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bunch — bunch; bunch·ber·ry; bunch·er; bunch·i·ly; …   English syllables

  • bunch — ► NOUN 1) a number of things growing or fastened together. 2) informal a group of people. 3) informal, chiefly N. Amer. a lot. ► VERB ▪ collect or form into a bunch. ● bunch of fives Cf. ↑bunch of fives …   English terms dictionary

  • Bunch — Bunch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Bunched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bunching}.] To swell out into a bunch or protuberance; to be protuberant or round. [1913 Webster] Bunching out into a large round knob at one end. Woodward. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bunch — Bunch, v. t. To form into a bunch or bunches. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”