exorbitant

  • 121Regulators of North Carolina — (1764–71) Vigilance group formed in the western frontier counties of North Carolina. Opposed to the high taxes and corruption of the colonial government, the group sought vainly to obtain reforms; it then refused to pay taxes, agitated against… …

    Universalium

  • 122Wang Anshi — or Wang An shih born 1021, Linchuan, Jiangsu province, China died 1086, Jiangning, Jiangsu Chinese poet and government reformer of the Song dynasty. His New Policies of 1069–76 sparked academic controversy that continued for centuries. He created …

    Universalium

  • 123Moral Aspects of Monopoly —     Moral Aspects of Monopoly     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Moral Aspects of Monopoly     According to its etymology, monopoly (monopolia) signifies exclusive sale, or exclusive privilege of selling. Present usage, however, extends the term to… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 124unconscionable — un·con·scio·na·ble /ˌən kän chə nə bəl/ adj: unreasonably unfair to one party, marked by oppression, or otherwise unacceptably offensive to public policy an unconscionable clause finds the contract...to have been unconscionable at the time it was …

    Law dictionary

  • 125Alpine regiments of the Roman army — Roman infantry helmet (Imperial Gallic type). Late 1st century Th …

    Wikipedia

  • 126David Frederick — (born April 9, 1961) is an appellate attorney in Washington, D.C., and is a partner with Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans Figel, P.L.L.C.[1] Contents 1 Education and legal training 2 Professional career 3 …

    Wikipedia

  • 127Arkansas Highway System — Highway markers for Interstate 40, US Highway 62 and AR 7 …

    Wikipedia

  • 128excessive — ex·ces·sive adj: exceeding what is proper, necessary, or normal; specif: being out of proportion to the offense excessive bail Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 129undue — un·due /ˌən dü, dyü/ adj 1: not due: not yet payable an undue bill 2: exceeding or violating propriety or fitness would impose undue hardship on the debtors such a requirement would place an undue burden on employers Merriam Webster’s …

    Law dictionary

  • 130unreasonable — un·rea·son·able adj: not reasonable: beyond what can be accepted: as a: clearly inappropriate, excessive, or harmful in degree or kind an unreasonable delay an unreasonable restraint of trade b: lacking justification in fact or circumstance an… …

    Law dictionary

  • 131extreme — I (exaggerated) adjective aggrandized, amplified, beyond the limit, drastic, enlarged, exceeding, exceeding the bounds of moderation, excessive, exorbitant, fanatical, flagrant, going to the utmost lengths, going too far, gross, hyperbolic,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 132immense — I adjective boundless, broad, bulky, capacious, colossal, endless, enormous, exorbitant, extremely large, far reaching, gigantic, grandiose, gross, huge, illimitable, immeasurable, innumerable, mammoth, massive, monumental, mountainous, myriad,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 133inordinate — I adjective crammed, exaggerated, exceeding, excessive, exorbitant, extortionate, extraordinary, extravagant, extreme, fanatical, gluttonous, great, immoderate, immoderatus, immodicus, inabstinent, intemperate, lavish, monstrous, needless,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 134intemperate — I adjective exceeding, excessive, exorbitant, extravagant, extreme, immoderate, inabstinent, indulgent, inordinate, unbridled, unchecked, uncontrolled, uncurbed, uninhibited, unlimited, unmeasured, unreined, unrestrained, unruly, unsuppressed,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 135outrageous — out·ra·geous /au̇t rā jəs/ adj: going beyond standards of decency: utterly intolerable in a civilized society outrageous conduct out·ra·geous·ly adv out·ra·geous·ness n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 136Deconstruction and Derrida — Simon Critchley and Timothy Mooney DERRIDIAN DECONSTRUCTION1 In the last twenty five years or so, particularly in the English speaking world, no philosopher has attracted more notoriety, controversy and misunderstanding than Jacques Derrida.… …

    History of philosophy

  • 137LINGUISTIQUE ET PSYCHANALYSE — La question des rapports entre la psychanalyse et la linguistique est compliquée par deux facteurs. D’une part, ces rapports ont évolué; ils ont en effet été si profondément transformés par l’œuvre de Jacques Lacan qu’on peut parler à cet égard… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 138assommoir — [ asɔmwar ] n. m. • 1700; de assommer 1 ♦ Vx Instrument qui sert à assommer. ⇒ casse tête. ♢ Mod. Fig. COUP D ASSOMMOIR : événement soudain qui assomme, accable; prix exorbitant. 2 ♦ (v. 1850) Vx Cabaret où les consommateurs s assomment d alcool …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 139extraordinaire — [ ɛkstraɔrdinɛr ] adj. • XIIIe; lat. extraordinarius « qui sort de l ordre » 1 ♦ Qui n est pas selon l usage ordinaire, selon l ordre commun. ⇒ anormal, exceptionnel, inhabituel, inusité. Les moyens habituels ne suffisant pas, on prit des mesures …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 140incroyable — [ ɛ̃krwajabl ] adj. et n. • 1513; increable 1500; de 1. in et croyable 1 ♦ Qui n est pas croyable; qu il est impossible ou très difficile de croire. ⇒ effarant, étonnant, étrange, fabuleux, 1. fort, prodigieux, renversant, surprenant. Un récit… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle