fold

  • 21 foldærn — foldærn2 n ( es/ ) earth house, grave …

    Old to modern English dictionary

  • 22 -fold — [fəuld US fould] suffix [: Old English; Origin: feald] 1.) [in adjectives] of a particular number of kinds ▪ The government s role in healthcare is twofold: first, to provide the resources and, second, to make them work better for patients. 2.)… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 23 -fold — [ fould ] suffix used with numbers to make adjectives and adverbs describing how much something increases: a fourfold increase (=an increase in an amount that makes it four times larger than before) …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 24 -fold — multiplicative suffix, from O.E. feald, related to O.N. faldr; Ger. falt; Goth. falþs; Gk. paltos, plos; L. plus. Crowded out in English by Latinate double, triple, etc., but still in MANIFOLD (Cf. manifold), HUNDREDFOLD (Cf. hundredfold), etc …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 25 fold|er — «FOHL duhr», noun. 1. a holder for papers, made by folding a piece of stiff paper: »Stacks of papers lay neatly sorted in labeled folders on his desk. 2. a pamphlet, usually made of one folded sheet: »The policeman handed out colorful folders… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 26 fold — fold1 foldable, adj. /fohld/, v.t. 1. to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself. 2. to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together (often fol. by up): to fold up a map; to fold one s legs under oneself. 3. to bring (the… …

    Universalium

  • 27 fold — fold1 [ fould ] verb ** 1. ) transitive to bend a piece of paper or cloth and press one part of it over another part: Carrie folded the note and slid it into her purse. fold something in half/two: Fold the paper in half diagonally. fold something …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 28 fold — I UK [fəʊld] / US [foʊld] verb Word forms fold : present tense I/you/we/they fold he/she/it folds present participle folding past tense folded past participle folded ** 1) a) [transitive] to bend a piece of paper or cloth and press one part of it …

    English dictionary

  • 29 fold — fold1 [fəuld US fould] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(bend)¦ 2¦(smaller/neater)¦ 3¦(furniture etc)¦ 4 fold your arms 5¦(business)¦ 6¦(cover)¦ 7 fold somebody in your arms Phrasal verbs  fold something<=>in ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [: Old English; Origin …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 30 fold — 1 verb 1 BEND (T) to bend a piece of paper, cloth etc by laying or pressing one part over another: Fold the paper along the dotted line. | fold sth in two/half: The woman folded the tickets in two and tore them in half. 2 MAKE STH SMALLER/NEATER… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 31 fold — [[t]fo͟ʊld[/t]] ♦♦♦ folds, folding, folded 1) VERB If you fold something such as a piece of paper or cloth, you bend it so that one part covers another part, often pressing the edge so that it stays in place. [V n] He folded the paper carefully …

    English dictionary

  • 32 fold —    by Simon O Sullivan   Although appearing throughout Deleuze s work, the fold is particularly mobilised in the books on Michel Foucault and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz. In each case the fold is developed in relation to another s work. We… …

    The Deleuze dictionary

  • 33 fold —    by Simon O Sullivan   Although appearing throughout Deleuze s work, the fold is particularly mobilised in the books on Michel Foucault and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz. In each case the fold is developed in relation to another s work. We… …

    The Deleuze dictionary

  • 34 fold — I. /foʊld / (say fohld) verb (t) 1. to double or bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself. 2. to bring together (the arms, hands, legs, etc.) with one round another: to fold one s arms on one s chest. 3. to bring (the wings) close to the body,… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 35 fold — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 part of sth folded ADJECTIVE ▪ loose, soft ▪ deep, heavy ▪ neat ▪ vertical …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 36 fold — I [[t]foʊld[/t]] v. t. 1) to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself 2) to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together: to fold up a map[/ex] 3) to bring together and intertwine or cross: He folded his arms on his chest[/ex] …

    From formal English to slang

  • 37 fold up — verb 1. bend or lay so that one part covers the other (Freq. 1) fold up the newspaper turn up your collar • Syn: ↑fold, ↑turn up • Ant: ↑unfold (for …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 38 fold — {{11}}fold (n.1) pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals, O.E. falæd, falud stall, stable, cattle pen, a general Germanic word (Cf. E.Fris. folt enclosure, dunghill, Du. vaalt dunghill, Dan. fold pen for sheep ), of uncertain origin …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 39 fold in — phrasal verb fold in or fold into [transitive] Word forms fold in : present tense I/you/we/they fold in he/she/it folds in present participle folding in past tense folded in past participle folded in 1) fold something in/into something to use a… …

    English dictionary

  • 40 fold — I fold 1. fold sb., en, er, erne (rynke; ombøjning); lægge ansigtet i de rette folder; de vante folder; slå sine folder II fold 2. fold sb., en, e, ene (indhegning); hestene går på fold III fold 3. fold sb. (itk.), fold, ene (et mål for… …

    Dansk ordbog