take+hold

  • 1 take hold — ► to start to have an effect: »New stimulus funds took hold in time to keep unemployment low. Main Entry: ↑hold …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 take hold — ► take hold start to have an effect. Main Entry: ↑hold …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3 take hold of — index accept (take), grapple, sequester (seize property) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 take hold — verb 1. assume control (Freq. 3) • Syn: ↑take charge, ↑take control • Hypernyms: ↑head, ↑lead • Hyponyms: ↑move in on …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5 take hold of — verb take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of (Freq. 1) Catch the ball! Grab the elevator door! • Syn: ↑catch, ↑grab • See Also: ↑catch up ( …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 take hold — to become established. Democracy cannot take hold there until peace has been achieved. It will be several years before new plants take hold in the area hit by the volcano s eruption …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 7 take hold — to become stronger and difficult to stop They were fortunate to escape before the fire took hold. take hold of: A sense of dread took hold of him …

    English dictionary

  • 8 take hold of — {v. phr.} To grasp. * /The old man tried to keep himself from falling down the stairs, but there was no railing to take hold of./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 take hold of — {v. phr.} To grasp. * /The old man tried to keep himself from falling down the stairs, but there was no railing to take hold of./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10 take\ hold\ of — v. phr. To grasp. The old man tried to keep himself from falling down the stairs, but there was no railing to take hold of …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 11 take hold — verb a) to grasp, seize Then the highly virulent mental germs skillfully inoculated took a hold in the subconscious mind of European humanity; the disease developed rapidly, spread like wild fire, and raged unabated throughout the width and… …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 take hold — start to have an effect. → hold …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 13 take hold of — to start holding someone or something She took hold of his hand …

    English dictionary

  • 14 take hold — phrasal 1. grasp, grip, seize 2. to become attached or established ; take effect …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 take hold of — capture, take control of …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 16 take hold of — Seize, fix on …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 17 Take Hold of the Flame — Infobox Single Name = Take Hold of the Flame Cover size = Border = Caption = Artist = Queensrÿche Album = The Warning A side = Take Hold of the Flame B side = Nightrider Released = 1984 Format = Vinyl Recorded = Angel Recording, Audio… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 take hold of something — catch, get, grab, take, etc. (a) ˈhold of sb/sth idiom to have or take sb/sth in your hands • He caught hold of her wrists so she couldn t get away. • Lee got hold of the dog by its collar. • Quick, grab a hold of that rope …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 19 take hold of somebody — catch, get, grab, take, etc. (a) ˈhold of sb/sth idiom to have or take sb/sth in your hands • He caught hold of her wrists so she couldn t get away. • Lee got hold of the dog by its collar. • Quick, grab a hold of that rope …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20 To take hold of — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English